Eastern Pequot Overseer Account from November 18, 1833 to February 13, 1834

 

Pequot Indians of North Stonington in account with Silas Chesebrough

 
     
 

Debit

 
     

1833

   

November 18

To paid court fees 81 cents

        .81

     

1834

January 21

To paid Charles G. Sisson for coffin for Esther Waugs as per bill  

      3.00

January 23

To Jesse Champlin for boarding Philena in full up to this time

      3.00

 

To one gallon molasses delivered Isaac Fagins by George W. Moss, February 2, 1832.  Omitted

        .40

 

To seven  yards sheeting1 delivered Tyra by George W. Moss, February 18, 1832.  Omitted

        .88

 

To boarding and care of Philena, three weeks, from January 23, 1834 to February 13, 1834

      3.00

 

To one shirt for Philena and tapping shoes2

        .75

   

 $11. 84

     
 

Credit

 
     

November 18

By balance due Pequot Indians on settlement with the Court

-$  6.97

 

Balance due

     4.87

 

To court fee paid on settling the account

       .81

   

 $  5.68

     

Addendum:

To the Honorable County Court now in session at New London within and for New London County, the subscriber respectfully asks to resign and to be excused from serving longer as Overseer to said Pequot Indians

 
 

Silas Chesebrough

 
 

February 13, 1834

 

Judicial Action:

Silas Chesebrough's account with Pequot Indians, 1834.  Settled and allowed by the Court, John DeWitt, clerk

 

Docketing:

1833 / 305 [ illegible ] / 317

 
  • 1. A sturdy plain-woven cloth usually of cotton used especially for bedsheets. Merriam-Webster.com.
  • 2. 19th Century taps were tiny pieces of metal nailed into the sole of a shoe to keep them from wearing down specific areas, generally the heel, ahead of the rest. Businessinsider, https://www.businessinsider.com/use-taps-to-protect-shoes-2016-11